Monthly Archives: October 2016

How to shoot portraits on location with outdoor flash – DIY Photography

On location flash photography is a snap when you use these tips.

Using flash on location is one of the best things you can to really push your outdoor portraits. Often, the natural light might give you exactly what you want, but often it does not. The sun might be in slightly the wrong position to give you the background you want. Or a lack of cloud […]

Source: How to shoot portraits on location with outdoor flash – DIY Photography

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This is how I meter and expose landscapes for color film – DIY Photography

Landscape exposure tips from a medium format film photographer.

Looking back through my archives, I realized that I’ve covered topics like film selections and scanning film but to date I’ve skipped one really important part: metering and exposing color film.  This is something I get quite a few questions about so bear with me while I try to be very thorough and cover topics from […]

Source: This is how I meter and expose landscapes for color film – DIY Photography

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Top Tips for Shooting Your First Family Photography Session

Tips for getting stellar images during a family photo session.

Family photography can be incredibly rewarding, although is not without its potential pitfalls. Some children love having their photos taken and will perfo

Source: Top Tips for Shooting Your First Family Photography Session

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Improving your night photography with foreground lighting – DIY Photography

Your astrophotography will stand out with some key foreground lighting.

One of the biggest challenges when it comes to night photography is incorporating good foreground elements, but learning a few simple tricks will instantly elevate your game. If you’ve ever snapped a shot of the Milky Way in a very dark area on a moonless night, you will find that the landscape elements will often be silhouetted […]

Source: Improving your night photography with foreground lighting – DIY Photography

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My thoughts on working for exposure (free)

Here is a funny video on how most professionals react when a customer asks to provide their services or products for spec or free.

My thoughts on the subject come from an entirely different perspective.

First off, other than the about section of this website, I do not advertise my services. Like many professionals, I am still honing my craft and use photo shoots to become better. I do not feel as if I have the right to charge a customer while I am learning.

Secondly, I don’t really want to own a “photography” business and would rather spend my time helping others through teaching and providing photographs at no or low cost. This makes it tough to keep funding my equipment habit so I keep my “day job.”

For friends and family, I will work for free as my way of giving back or as a gift. For those in need, I do my best to keep it free or request enough to pay for my gas or equipment upkeep.

This does present a problem for all the paid photographers of whom I may or may not be taking business. It could drive the cost down to the point where they are not making enough money to survive. Or, the clientele with whom I am engaged may not be willing to pay for portraits and may be willing to forgo the pictures.

Agree with me or not, I will continue to provide portrait and event photography services for little or no cost as I hone my craft. When I get to the point where I feel I have reached a masterly level, I may charge a reasonable fee or just relegate my skills as giving back to the community.

Posted in Editorial Tagged , , |

Event photography

If you want to test your skills at sports photography, candid street photography or just plain old portrait style photography, volunteer at a local 5k and you will get an opportunity to practice all three.

I had the privilege of shooting the Zombie Outbreak 5k hosted by the Warren Spouses Club. Lions Park in Cheyenne was a great venue and I was familiar with the course because of a previous 5k.

First, show up early and get candids of all the volunteers helping set up the event. The race director will be the one with her hair on fire and provides ample opportunities for candid shots trying to manage the mayhem. If there is a medal table, try an artsy shot of the medals or trophy.

Second, scope out areas of the course that have some non-distracting backgrounds. Also, look at the direction of the sun and try to catch an area where the runners nor you are staring in the sun. Often times, this is unavoidable but getting runners from the side with sun at your back is optimal. A section of course close to a water stop is good because you can get interaction with volunteers and some of the runners will slow down and allow you a photo op.

Third scope out the start and finish as the race director will want these shot immediately to post on social media. I opt for the low shot at the start line with the shoes whizzing past the start line.

Fourth, run to your go to spot you found in step two and catch as many single runners flying past. Multiple runners result in a chaotic scene.

Fifth, after shooting for about ten minutes, fast runners in a 5k will be making their way to the finish line. Make sure to catch the overall finisher, first male, first female and any other first the race director wants.

Lastly, capture some shots of runners hydrating and eating snacks, laying on the ground or doing some sort of recovery. At some point, the race director will want a photo op with the finishers so find a good location.

Most participants will go through all the pics the first time looking for themselves and people they know. The second time through, they will be checking out costumes or great candids of the event.

Once the event is over, send the pics of the first finishers to the event director then ask how he wants the photos to be delivered. Dropbox is a great way due to the sheer number of images.

Posted in Editorial, Events, Techniques Tagged , |

Tips for Getting Started with Coastal Photography

Become a pro at coastal photography using a these tips.

Many of us start out treating coastal photography the same as landscape photography. There are a lot of similarities. For both, you head out into the great outdoors, often to remote locations. You need a tripod and a remote shutter release for stabilization. You are capturing an entire scene rather than a discrete item or […]

Source: Tips for Getting Started with Coastal Photography

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Step by Step Tutorial for How to Shoot Tethered

A step by step guide to your first tethered photo shoot.

If you want to shoot tethered and have your images instantly appear on your tablet or laptop, here is a tutorial to help you get it set up.

Source: Step by Step Tutorial for How to Shoot Tethered

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7 Tips for Capturing More Powerful Fine Art Landscape Photography

Is your landscape photography in need of a boost? Try out some of these tips.

Capturing powerful landscape photographs, images that might be considered “Fine Art,” is no easy task. Here are 7 tips that have helped me to capture bette

Source: 7 Tips for Capturing More Powerful Fine Art Landscape Photography

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